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Why Crowd-Funded Video Games Is Worth The Gamble

Kickstater campaign sprout out of money

By passing over new-found development of information on video games, AAA publishers are missing out on great investments

AAA publishers lose out when they turn their backs on small video game entrepreneurs. But that is their loss. Now more and more video games are being funded by millions of people like you and me. After all, who better to know what games to bet on than mobile casino gambling players and bettors on the internet worldwide?

Kickstarter is one such initiative that is making AAA publishers sorry they didn’t get there first. The trend is becoming more and more feasible. For making money on games created by passionate game creators which had been snorted on by big-name publishers, is easier than we think.

Kickstarters support rejected games

Bloodstained Ritual of the night concept

Today, Kickstarter campaigns feature a wide variety of games that have either been disapproved of or scorned on by popular publishers. But thanks to well-meaning internet support movements like Kickstarter campaigns, games are given a chance to be released on the market, successfully.

Series and titles that once garnered support from important publishers in the industry have had their “spiritual successor” ignored by the AAA publishers. One such success story is Koji Iragashi’s Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night, a spin-off of the popular Castlevania series.

Within 4 days USD 1 million made

Igarashi’s plan was to have a 30-day campaign with funds amounting to $500,000 needed to get the game up and running on the internet under EU gambling laws, in Europe. But what happened surpassed Igarashi’s expectations. Within 4 hours the more than USD 1 million from Kickstarter-backers, was collected. With more coming in hourly.

Igarashi explained that he had gone to several big-name publishers asking them to show an interest in Bloodstained. To no avail, left only with empty promises, he turned to the internet to have his dream crowd-funded. When 1 million dollars was contributed by avid game fans in record time, Igarashi knew his Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night’s Kickstarter campaign was a whopping success.

Lack of creative freedom produces Yooka-Laylee

Other video game creators have also met similar success. 3D platformer Yooka-Laylee from Playtonic Games, is also a game that generated more than $1 million dollars within forty minutes from the start of its Kickstarter campaign. So far, Yooka-Laylee’s Kickstarter campaign has skyrocketed with over $1 million in pledges from fans.

Former RARE developers’ Yooka-Laylee’s creators said that their wish to create Yooka-Laylee was driven by the fact that they were not given the creative freedom needed to make games like Banjo-Kazooie, a Microsoft Studios-owned title.

Publishers hate 3D platformer

Banjo Kazooie Nuts and Bolts

Members of Playtonic Games said overall major publishers didn’t think that 3D platformers would capture internet gambling fans’ attention. For example, RARE’s Banjo-Kazooie was rejected. So was Nuts & Bolts on Xbox 360, because of it lacked elements that had metamorphosed its predecessor into a “beloved classic”.

Major publishers aren’t capable of anticipating a crowd-pleaser. They only bet on well-established titles. Because of this phenomenon, publishers think that only those kind of games will get eaten up by internet gamers, much to the dismay of many small game creators.

By stereotyping games suitable for internet, publishers are losing out too

In an internet world where the gambling industry thinks that only a certain type of game will pay, there are now other types of games piercing into the market and finding huge success because it was able to attract a particular kind of gaming fan.

Why would publishers forego the opportunity of making a large amount of money given the success stories of games like Yooka-Laylee and Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night ? Now, if we could get a Betway Casino review to mention crowd-funded games there would be even more money on the table for everyone!

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