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The Future of Horse Racing: Disparate Views on the Traditional Sport

  • Horse racing is one of the most popular betting options in the UK
  • Changes are necessary to make the treatment of animals better
the future of horse racing

Horse racing is part of British sports culture, and as such, closely connects to betting. Many say that horse race betting is in a downfall, yet there are arguments on both sides. In the future of horse racing, however, loud voices collide. From machine training to animal welfare the future of horse racing raises many questions. In this article, we discuss the debate on the popular UK leisure activity. 

In a recent article, we have talked about the evolution of horse racing with hints on potential future debates. While we consider horse racing and betting an ever so popular sport in the UK, many fear that the sport will lose its natural touch. How so? Technology, business and animal welfare collide. On online sportsbook sites in the UK, the future of horse racing seems bright, yet we ought to investigate the controversial issues of this industry!

Animal rights and the future of horse racing

There are disparate views on what is natural when it comes to racing and training horses. And when we talk about racehorses, indeed, it is good to keep in mind that we are discussing specific racing breeds. Of course, it is only right for animal welfare services to speak up on issues they consider harmful. The horses’ stressful behaviour is something that is considered a pro in a racing environment. However, animal advocates disagree.

A stressed animal not only raises questions on their general well being but the legitimacy of this industry as a whole. In today’s society, we pay more and more attention to the wellbeing of our planet, animals and our mental health. With no intention to break this tendency, we suggest looking for alternate paths in horse race betting. Keeping this traditional and thriving industry is an interest for the British public, culture and economy. To this end, let’s discuss some suggestions on the future of horse racing, and see how much we can agree.

the future of horse racing
Let’s race!

Original thoughts on making the industry better

In 2019, a controversial set of footage came out after the Melbourne Cup in Australia. The mistreatment of animals created a heated discussion on animal welfare. As a result, animal welfare services published a set of suggestions to make this industry better and more humane for everybody. Amongst their wishes, they concluded the ban of whips, the full ban of jump racing and ending two-year-old racing. Furthermore, they advocate for the improvement of post-racing retirement and tracking, and the ban of tongue ties.

Horse racing is incredibly popular to watch and bet on sites like Unibet Sportsbook. For the industry to live a long life and keep up the public’s interest, it is necessary to improve the treatment of animals. First and foremost, excessive breading and the “wastage” of animals should be heavily controlled. It is important for the industry to be transparent in today’s age. Horse racing is a massive industry,  and it should take the necessary steps to fund and care for not only their profit but their animals who make it.

The reaction of the horse racing business

In recent years, a lot has been done. While there is still room for improvement, we are entering a more caring era in horse racing. The industry relies on technology to make the longevity of the animals more sustainable. There is a new technology with respect to stem cells. Stem cells are present in humans just as much as in thoroughbred horses. Its aim is to help the recovery of injured horses to avoid early retirement and over-breading. Follow updates on the horse racing community, while taking a look at our betting guide on horse racing. To see the best odds, visit Unibet Sportsbook!

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